Know the Impact of Bankruptcy on Your Taxes

Know the Impact of Bankruptcy on Your Taxes

The term bankruptcy is considered as a legal status of an individual or company that happens to be unable to repay their incurred debts from their creditors. In most cases, bankruptcy is being imposed by the court orders. It is usually initiated by the debtor. However, sometimes the weight of the issue is given to the debtor from the creditors.

YOU ARE ONE OF 50,000,000 AMERICANS WHO MUST F...
YOU ARE ONE OF 50,000,000 AMERICANS WHO MUST FILL OUT AN INCOME TAX RETURN BY MARCH 15. FILE YOURS EARLY. – NARA – 516201 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The IRS pub 17 2013 signifies the legal implications on income taxes. This involves the possibility of declaring bankruptcy and its variable forms. Chapter 11 bankruptcy pertains to the debts of the person being reorganized. In this scenario, the debtors have ways to repay some or total amount of their debts. The Chapter 7 bankruptcy involves the liquidation of the debtor’s assets and liabilities. In this situation, the debtors have no means to repay most, if not, the total amount of their debt.

How can Bankruptcy Create an Impact to Debts

Basically, filling of bankruptcy is very complicated. This makes it important for you to consult a bankruptcy lawyer to ensure that all actions you make are done appropriately. In general, bankruptcy does not create impacts to your income tax return, even if there is a cancellation of debt, which is normally taxable on your tax returns.
The reason behind this is that any sources of debts discharged in bankruptcy are excluded from the incomes under the income tax regulations. The regulations pertaining to bankruptcy in relation with income tax returns are:

1. If you are being audited, filling of bankruptcy will not stop the auditing. However, it will stop the collection process while the bankruptcy is on pending status. Moreover, the time collection activities stop, such as during the time that you are deemed as not collectible or during the processing of the compromise state is extended. Always consider these concerns before declaring bankruptcy.

2. Not all of tax debts are entitled for discharge in bankruptcy. Items that are considered as priority debt are not dis-chargeable, as well. This includes student loans, child support, fines stemming from committing of felonies, and drunk driving cases. The priority debts should be fully repaid, which are classified under the Chapter 13 bankruptcy.

Forgiveness of debt is usually considered as taxable income. However, it becomes ineffective to insolvency and bankruptcy. Sometimes, it is good to present offer in compromise by settling your tax debt. It is still suggested to confer your debt issues with a tax professional and bankruptcy attorney in order to come up with a set of appropriate course of action. This can help you eliminate the possibilities of applying legal actions, which are not suitable for your specific case.

Discharging Tax Debt Through Bankruptcy

Filing for bankruptcy can be an effective way to get out of debt and get started rebuilding your financial life. While bankruptcy can provide quicker relief than other options such as debt settlement or credit counseling, some debts are ineligible for discharge. When dealing with tax debt, it can be difficult to get a discharge for it through bankruptcy. While it is possible, you’ll have to make sure that you meet certain standards. Otherwise, your tax debts may remain even after you file for bankruptcy.

Tax debts are subject to specific rules that must be met before they can be discharged in any kind of bankruptcy. The tax debt in question must be at least 36 months old in order to be eligible. When you need to discharge a tax debt, the return associated with that debt must have been filed at least 24 months ago as well. In addition to filing the return more than 24 months ago, you also have to make sure that the tax assessment is at least eight months old. The tax return that you file also has to be legitimate and cannot be fraudulent. You also cannot simply file for bankruptcy so that you can get out of paying taxes. This is considered tax evasion and is against the law.

If you want to qualify for bankruptcy discharge with your tax debt, you also have to prove that you have filed your last previous four tax returns with the Internal Revenue Service. Without having proof of filing those returns, you will not be eligible to have the debt discharged through the bankruptcy process.

While it is possible to get your tax debt discharged in bankruptcy, it is not very likely. In order to get part of your tax debt discharged, you have to prove that it is at least three years old. In most cases, the Internal Revenue Service will start contacting you almost immediately after your tax debt is not paid. The chances of you being able to hold out for more than three years without having anything done by the IRS are not good. The Internal Revenue Service has many ways that they can try to get you to pay your tax debt. For example, the IRS can file a tax lien on your property and make it difficult to sell any of your property without paying back the debt. In some cases, the IRS also has the right to seize your property such as your house, your vehicle, jewelry, securities and money from your bank account. If you do not pay the debt in the appropriate amount of time, the IRS will start trying to collect this money from you.

If you are having trouble repaying your tax debt, you may want to explore some other options besides trying to wait out the three year period for filing bankruptcy. For example, you could try to set up an installment agreement with the IRS or use an offer in compromise to settle your tax debt for less than you owe. The IRS will evaluate your proposal and decide if it is worth accepting.

How To Claim Bankruptcy – The Information You Need To Know

The personal bankruptcy process can be a saving grace for debtors who are looking to completely eliminate large portions of debt. Although there are significant consequences associated with filing bankruptcy under Chapter 7, doing so is often the only real option for people who have exhausted some of the traditional methods of debt repair. For most people, the bankruptcy process itself can seem intimidating and often overwhelming. However, we will provide you with the basic information you need to get on the right track.

People often want to know how to claim bankruptcy in the most efficient way possible, which is why we’ve compiled the following list of tips –

•    Get Qualified – not everyone qualifies for bankruptcy protection, which is why it’s important to see where you stand prior to making a firm commitment to the process. Eligibility is determined by a “means test,” which looks at your complete financial picture to determine if you are truly in need of financial assistance through the Government’s plan.

•    Enroll in Credit Counseling – once you’ve determined that you are eligible to file, you will want to enroll in a court approved credit counseling course within 180-days of filing your claim. Attending credit counseling is required by law, so don’t wait.

•    Secure an Attorney – one of the best things you can do is to hire a reputable bankruptcy attorney to assist you with your case. Although attorneys aren’t required by law, the right person or firm can help see you through the entire process. They can fill out paperwork, offer legal advice and can even represent you in court.

•    Understand the Consequences – at the risk of stating the obvious, you should know what you are getting into before filing a claim. Setting up an initial consultation with an attorney can be a great way to find out what you’re in for.

For more information on the personal bankruptcy process and for a complete guide on how to claim bankruptcy, please visit your source on the web for bankruptcy information at Claiming Bankruptcy.